OK: Found an XML parser.
OK: Support for GZIP encoding.
OK: Support for character munging.

Notice: MagpieRSS [debug] Returning STALE object for https://bofads.com/feed in /home/users/web06/0/6/0221860/www.yumomi.jp/feed2js/magpie/rss_fetch.inc on line 243

Example Output

Channel: bofads.com

RSS URL:

Parsed Results (var_dump'ed)

object(MagpieRSS)#2 (23) {
  ["parser"]=>
  int(0)
  ["current_item"]=>
  array(0) {
  }
  ["items"]=>
  array(10) {
    [0]=>
    array(11) {
      ["title"]=>
      string(72) "Shocking Hollywood’s Most Down to Earth Celebrities – nonenglishfeed"
      ["link"]=>
      string(85) "https://bofads.com/shocking-hollywoods-most-down-to-earth-celebrities-nonenglishfeed/"
      ["dc"]=>
      array(1) {
        ["creator"]=>
        string(10) "Susan Paul"
      }
      ["pubdate"]=>
      string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:36:59 +0000"
      ["category"]=>
      string(56) "TrendingcelebritiesEarthHollywoodsnonenglishfeedShocking"
      ["guid"]=>
      string(85) "https://bofads.com/shocking-hollywoods-most-down-to-earth-celebrities-nonenglishfeed/"
      ["description"]=>
      string(625) "When you think about Hollywood celebrities, there’s often an image of them being out of touch with the normal world. They spend their time in absolute luxury, being revered by pretty much everyone that crosses their path. It’s hard to imagine they know what it feels like to live paycheck to paycheck and make ends ... Read more"
      ["content"]=>
      array(1) {
        ["encoded"]=>
        string(5010) "

When you think about Hollywood celebrities, there’s often an image of them being out of touch with the normal world. They spend their time in absolute luxury, being revered by pretty much everyone that crosses their path. It’s hard to imagine they know what it feels like to live paycheck to paycheck and make ends meet at the end of the month. When you add all that up together, it’s only natural that we assume they don’t live in the same plane of existence as us normal mortals do. (Also Read: Judith & Robin Find Filming Locations and Recreate the Scene)

Thankfully, some Hollywood celebrities are very overtly an exception to this rule. They’re the most humble and down to Earth people you could meet. It does a lot to make these people seem more approachable and likeable. Let’s take a look at some down to Earth Hollywood celebrities.

Jeff Goldblum

Not only is the man a walking meme, he’s also the most approachable celebrity out there. Not seldom you’ll find him handing out autographs and actually thanking the fans for it, which is just one of the many examples of this man’s humble and thankful attitude. And let’s not forget that this man has such a huge amount of wit and charm.

Chris Pratt

Despite a small thing on Twitter where Chris Pratt was suddenly deemed the “least likeable Chris in the MCU”, colleagues and friends were quick enough to come to Chris’ defence since – as we all pretty much assumed – he’s a genuinely good guy. I mean, the guy dresses up as Star Lord and goes visiting sick kids at the hospital, for crying out loud.

Adele

Adele is known as a very quirky and always-herself kind of artist. She never tries to be better than who or what she is, never drops the juicy British accent, and is never not nice to people. And even though she’s one of the biggest stars on the planet, she’s still a huge Rihanna fangirl.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Shocking Hollywood’s Most Down to Earth Celebrities – nonenglishfeed

" } ["summary"]=> string(625) "When you think about Hollywood celebrities, there’s often an image of them being out of touch with the normal world. They spend their time in absolute luxury, being revered by pretty much everyone that crosses their path. It’s hard to imagine they know what it feels like to live paycheck to paycheck and make ends ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(5010) "

When you think about Hollywood celebrities, there’s often an image of them being out of touch with the normal world. They spend their time in absolute luxury, being revered by pretty much everyone that crosses their path. It’s hard to imagine they know what it feels like to live paycheck to paycheck and make ends meet at the end of the month. When you add all that up together, it’s only natural that we assume they don’t live in the same plane of existence as us normal mortals do. (Also Read: Judith & Robin Find Filming Locations and Recreate the Scene)

Thankfully, some Hollywood celebrities are very overtly an exception to this rule. They’re the most humble and down to Earth people you could meet. It does a lot to make these people seem more approachable and likeable. Let’s take a look at some down to Earth Hollywood celebrities.

Jeff Goldblum

Not only is the man a walking meme, he’s also the most approachable celebrity out there. Not seldom you’ll find him handing out autographs and actually thanking the fans for it, which is just one of the many examples of this man’s humble and thankful attitude. And let’s not forget that this man has such a huge amount of wit and charm.

Chris Pratt

Despite a small thing on Twitter where Chris Pratt was suddenly deemed the “least likeable Chris in the MCU”, colleagues and friends were quick enough to come to Chris’ defence since – as we all pretty much assumed – he’s a genuinely good guy. I mean, the guy dresses up as Star Lord and goes visiting sick kids at the hospital, for crying out loud.

Adele

Adele is known as a very quirky and always-herself kind of artist. She never tries to be better than who or what she is, never drops the juicy British accent, and is never not nice to people. And even though she’s one of the biggest stars on the planet, she’s still a huge Rihanna fangirl.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Shocking Hollywood’s Most Down to Earth Celebrities – nonenglishfeed

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631302619) } [1]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(63) "Graham Norton Show returns with No Time to Die’s Daniel Craig" ["link"]=> string(80) "https://bofads.com/graham-norton-show-returns-with-no-time-to-dies-daniel-craig/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:27:04 +0000" ["category"]=> string(52) "Movie NewsCraigDanielDiesGrahamNortonreturnsShowTime" ["guid"]=> string(80) "https://bofads.com/graham-norton-show-returns-with-no-time-to-dies-daniel-craig/" ["description"]=> string(587) "The Graham Norton Show is coming back to our screens for its 29th series (!) later this month, and as ever, Graham will be chatting to some very famous faces when it does. To celebrate the upcoming release of Daniel Craig’s final outing as 007 in No Time to Die, The Graham Norton Show has ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(14580) "

The Graham Norton Show is coming back to our screens for its 29th series (!) later this month, and as ever, Graham will be chatting to some very famous faces when it does.

To celebrate the upcoming release of Daniel Craig’s final outing as 007 in No Time to Die, The Graham Norton Show has invited some of the biggest current Bond stars to be a part of the season’s opening episode on Friday, September 24.

Joining Graham in the studio for the chat show’s return are James Bond himself Daniel Craig, Bohemian Rhapsody star and Bond baddie Rami Malek, Léa Seydoux, and Lashana Lynch.

MGM / Nicole Where

And that’s not all – Ed Sheeran will also be squeezing onto the sofa for a gossip, before performing his new single ‘Shivers’ for the audience.

It’s like Graham never left.

Elsewhere in 007-related news, No Time to Die‘s director Cary Joji Fukunaga was recently forced to deny rumours that Rami Malek’s character in the new movie is actually a classic villain from the Bond franchise vault.

rami malek as safin, bond no time to die

MGM / Nicole Where

Related: No Time to Die gets two new trailers that confirm its release date

“Everyone thinks it’s so easy to make these tentpole films, that it’s just formulaic and you just plug-and-play and people are going to show up for the cinema,” Fukunaga said in response to the chatter.

“Actually, if you want a good film you have to take it seriously and put a lot of thought into it. It takes a lot of smart people to create these films, and also to create these characters that will hopefully last.”

Malek’s villain Safin is not Dr No, then. “This is a new villain,” the filmmaker insisted. “He’s not, as some have speculated, Dr No. Hopefully he’ll be one that is lasting in some way.”

The Graham Norton Show returns Friday, September 24 at 10.35pm on BBC One.

No Time to Die is out in UK cinemas on September 30 and in US cinemas on October 8. All the previous Bond movies are available on DVD or Blu-ray.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Graham Norton Show returns with No Time to Die’s Daniel Craig

" } ["summary"]=> string(587) "The Graham Norton Show is coming back to our screens for its 29th series (!) later this month, and as ever, Graham will be chatting to some very famous faces when it does. To celebrate the upcoming release of Daniel Craig’s final outing as 007 in No Time to Die, The Graham Norton Show has ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(14580) "

The Graham Norton Show is coming back to our screens for its 29th series (!) later this month, and as ever, Graham will be chatting to some very famous faces when it does.

To celebrate the upcoming release of Daniel Craig’s final outing as 007 in No Time to Die, The Graham Norton Show has invited some of the biggest current Bond stars to be a part of the season’s opening episode on Friday, September 24.

Joining Graham in the studio for the chat show’s return are James Bond himself Daniel Craig, Bohemian Rhapsody star and Bond baddie Rami Malek, Léa Seydoux, and Lashana Lynch.

MGM / Nicole Where

And that’s not all – Ed Sheeran will also be squeezing onto the sofa for a gossip, before performing his new single ‘Shivers’ for the audience.

It’s like Graham never left.

Elsewhere in 007-related news, No Time to Die‘s director Cary Joji Fukunaga was recently forced to deny rumours that Rami Malek’s character in the new movie is actually a classic villain from the Bond franchise vault.

rami malek as safin, bond no time to die

MGM / Nicole Where

Related: No Time to Die gets two new trailers that confirm its release date

“Everyone thinks it’s so easy to make these tentpole films, that it’s just formulaic and you just plug-and-play and people are going to show up for the cinema,” Fukunaga said in response to the chatter.

“Actually, if you want a good film you have to take it seriously and put a lot of thought into it. It takes a lot of smart people to create these films, and also to create these characters that will hopefully last.”

Malek’s villain Safin is not Dr No, then. “This is a new villain,” the filmmaker insisted. “He’s not, as some have speculated, Dr No. Hopefully he’ll be one that is lasting in some way.”

The Graham Norton Show returns Friday, September 24 at 10.35pm on BBC One.

No Time to Die is out in UK cinemas on September 30 and in US cinemas on October 8. All the previous Bond movies are available on DVD or Blu-ray.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Graham Norton Show returns with No Time to Die’s Daniel Craig

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631302024) } [2]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(90) "Joe Stapleton Helped Bring Poker Realism to New ‘Card Counter’ Film – nonenglishfeed" ["link"]=> string(100) "https://bofads.com/joe-stapleton-helped-bring-poker-realism-to-new-card-counter-film-nonenglishfeed/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:20:36 +0000" ["category"]=> string(72) "TrendingBringCardCounterfilmHelpedJoenonenglishfeedPokerRealismStapleton" ["guid"]=> string(100) "https://bofads.com/joe-stapleton-helped-bring-poker-realism-to-new-card-counter-film-nonenglishfeed/" ["description"]=> string(683) "Most poker fans have had the experience. A poker-related film or television show features action that really doesn’t play out as it would in the real world. Joe Stapleton knows the feeling. The longtime poker player, commentator, and comedian hopes his role as a poker consultant on the new film The Card Counter helped add ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(13737) "

Most poker fans have had the experience. A poker-related film or television show features action that really doesn’t play out as it would in the real world.

Joe Stapleton knows the feeling. The longtime poker player, commentator, and comedian hopes his role as a poker consultant on the new film The Card Counter helped add more realism to the story. Hopefully, the film won’t leave poker players rolling their eyes.

“Obviously there aren’t a lot of poker movies out there, but we’ve all watched movies with poker in them and seen things happen and you’re like, ‘Aw come on!’” he says. “I was happy to do this both on a  personal level but also as a service to the poker community – as a poker fan.”

In other words, don’t look for the protagonist to toss his Rolex into the pot. The movie, written and directed by Paul Schrader, officially hit theaters on Friday. Schrader was determined not just to make a great film, but also to make the card playing seem legit. That’s where Stapleton came in.

FREE $20 GOLD COIN PACKAGE

With a Verified Account. PLUS get a $40 Gold Coin Package for $20 on purchase

US Players Accepted

Daily FREE Sweeps Coins Just For Logging In

Texas Hold’em Ring Games, Tourneys, and SNGs

Redeemable For Cash Prizes

Poker as part of the film setting

The Card Counter tells the story of William Tell (played by Oscar Isaac), who travels to mid-American casinos as a blackjack card counter and plays some poker as well.

A former special ops officer, Tell has a deep, abiding guilt after serving time in a military prison for crimes committed in Iraq. He discovers a surrogate family while playing poker .

Along the way, Tell mentors a younger man dealing with the suicide of his father, who was also a soldier in Iraq. Guilt-ridden and feeling he should be punished more, Tell continues to numb the pain with casinos, poker, and blackjack. The film ultimately portrays one man seeking redemption.

Martin Scorsese served as an executive after also collaborating with Schrader on Taxi Driver. So far, The Card Counter has received nice reviews – including an 86% rating among critics so far at Rotten Tomatoes.

However, Stapleton had a different set of reviewers to please – poker players. The World Series of Poker Circuit plays a major role and Stapleton hoped players would be pleased that any embarrassing poker scenes wouldn’t make it to theaters.

Overseeing the poker presented on camera

Becoming a poker film consultant wasn’t a career goal for Stapleton, but things just seemed to fall into place. He lives in The Angels and movie producer friend Lauren Mann read Schrader’s script and thought it might interest Stapleton. The script included plenty of poker scenes and Mann sent it to him for some input.

“I read it and as a favor to her, I did a whole bunch of pages of notes,” he says. “I was like, ‘As my friend, I can’t let you make a poker movie that has this many sort of poker pitfalls in it.’ She sent the notes off to Paul and he was like, ‘We’ve got to hire this guy.’”

From there, Stapleton became the film’s poker consultant and helped iron out inconsistencies between Hollywood’s version of poker and the real thing.

“From the beginning, both Paul and the producers wanted to make the movie as authentic as possible,” he says. “Obviously not every suggestion I made got through, but almost everything did. They were really just super keen on making this something that poker players could at the very least see and not only point out where the poker went wrong, and be able to focus on the rest of the movie.”

What was one of the bigger flaws Stapleton had to work out with the production crew? The game’s jargon and vocabulary were the biggest concerns.

“As you can see from the end result of the movie, there’s a lot of talking about poker and a lot of dialogue,” Stapleton says, “so I had to make suggestions just over things of authenticity and the way that people speak.”

Beyond simply poker banter

Correcting poker language inconsistencies wasn’t Stapleton’s only concern. His role also went beyond just the mechanics of the game itself.

“It wasn’t just the writing where they wanted authenticity,” he says. “They wanted it to look authentic too, so I suggested locations, various wardrobe, (et cetera) … to try and make this look as authentic as possible.”

Stapleton even used some connections at Poker Night in America and D+B Publishing to appear in the movie. He hoped his role would give The Card Counter a real link to the modern poker world.

That even includes using WSOP logos. Overall, Stapleton enjoyed his consulting debut, but had to thread the needle of making suggestions while not stepping on toes.

“It was really fun,” he says. “I will say that it was incredibly stressful. I honestly didn’t even quite understand how revered Paul is as a filmmaker until much later.

“It was kind of stressful in that Paul’s trying to tell a story, Oscar Isaac and Tiffany Haddish are trying to act, and you’ve got me saying, ‘Hey guys, you keep saying gutshot but it’s really a flush.’ That kind of thing. It was just fun and terrifying at the same time.”

Spotlighting poker’s lower ranks

Many movies involving poker tend to gravitate to some of the game’s upper echelons and glitterati. Rounders focuses on Mike McDermott’s attempt to eventually make it big at the WSOP.

Molly’s Game featured Hollywood actors and elites playing for big money. Even Casino Royale has James Bond squaring off in a Texas Hold’em battle for millions.

The Card Counter took a different route, instead offering a glimpse into some of the game’s lower-level grinders. William Tell travels to cheap hotels battling it out on the WSOP Circuit.

“Initially, I think that Paul wanted the whole thing to be driving toward Las Vegas and the World Series,” Stapleton says. “Paul likes just to lay low (when filming), so doing these small daily tournaments we see (William Tell) popping into throughout the movie was definitely Paul’s idea. But to have him stay there was something we all kind of guided based on believability of the character and what we were going to be able to pull off visually.”

Recreating the WSOP stage in Las Vegas didn’t make sense from a practical or financial standpoint. The bright lights of Vegas didn’t seem to fit with the overall story.

Refining the film also meant not going overboard with exact poker lexicon. Tell isn’t a 20-something online pro. Stapelton tried to find some middle ground so the character’s dialogue doesn’t seem too hardcore poker.

“Just because this guy is a good poker player, doesn’t mean that he would know all of the terminology that young kids use who are the best poker players in the world,” he says. “The crowd that he runs with is the kind of crowd that sometimes gets things a little bit wrong in their rationale or in their use of poker terminology.”

FREE $20 GOLD COIN PACKAGE

With a Verified Account. PLUS get a $40 Gold Coin Package for $20 on purchase

US Players Accepted

Daily FREE Sweeps Coins Just For Logging In

Texas Hold’em Ring Games, Tourneys, and SNGs

Redeemable For Cash Prizes

Not a poker movie, just a good film

Movies involving poker rarely focus solely on the game. Poker can be used as a storytelling tool and also hold some symbolism for bigger meanings in life.

Stapleton was afraid there may not be enough poker for fans, although there is quite a bit of grinding it out. Poker itself can be fairly straightforward – the player either wins or loses, Stapleton says.

He’s hoping viewers will find a nice tale involving the game, but with bigger themes and simply a great movie.

“What I hope poker fans take away from it is much the same that I did – eventually I stopped caring about the poker and really cared about this character and what was going to happen,” he says. “I’m hoping the poker will get poker fans in the door, and then they’re going to realize that they just watched another Paul Schrader masterpiece.”

For USPoker’s interview with The Card Counter writer and director Paul Schrader, click here.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Joe Stapleton Helped Bring Poker Realism to New ‘Card Counter’ Film – nonenglishfeed

" } ["summary"]=> string(683) "Most poker fans have had the experience. A poker-related film or television show features action that really doesn’t play out as it would in the real world. Joe Stapleton knows the feeling. The longtime poker player, commentator, and comedian hopes his role as a poker consultant on the new film The Card Counter helped add ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(13737) "

Most poker fans have had the experience. A poker-related film or television show features action that really doesn’t play out as it would in the real world.

Joe Stapleton knows the feeling. The longtime poker player, commentator, and comedian hopes his role as a poker consultant on the new film The Card Counter helped add more realism to the story. Hopefully, the film won’t leave poker players rolling their eyes.

“Obviously there aren’t a lot of poker movies out there, but we’ve all watched movies with poker in them and seen things happen and you’re like, ‘Aw come on!’” he says. “I was happy to do this both on a  personal level but also as a service to the poker community – as a poker fan.”

In other words, don’t look for the protagonist to toss his Rolex into the pot. The movie, written and directed by Paul Schrader, officially hit theaters on Friday. Schrader was determined not just to make a great film, but also to make the card playing seem legit. That’s where Stapleton came in.

FREE $20 GOLD COIN PACKAGE

With a Verified Account. PLUS get a $40 Gold Coin Package for $20 on purchase

US Players Accepted

Daily FREE Sweeps Coins Just For Logging In

Texas Hold’em Ring Games, Tourneys, and SNGs

Redeemable For Cash Prizes

Poker as part of the film setting

The Card Counter tells the story of William Tell (played by Oscar Isaac), who travels to mid-American casinos as a blackjack card counter and plays some poker as well.

A former special ops officer, Tell has a deep, abiding guilt after serving time in a military prison for crimes committed in Iraq. He discovers a surrogate family while playing poker .

Along the way, Tell mentors a younger man dealing with the suicide of his father, who was also a soldier in Iraq. Guilt-ridden and feeling he should be punished more, Tell continues to numb the pain with casinos, poker, and blackjack. The film ultimately portrays one man seeking redemption.

Martin Scorsese served as an executive after also collaborating with Schrader on Taxi Driver. So far, The Card Counter has received nice reviews – including an 86% rating among critics so far at Rotten Tomatoes.

However, Stapleton had a different set of reviewers to please – poker players. The World Series of Poker Circuit plays a major role and Stapleton hoped players would be pleased that any embarrassing poker scenes wouldn’t make it to theaters.

Overseeing the poker presented on camera

Becoming a poker film consultant wasn’t a career goal for Stapleton, but things just seemed to fall into place. He lives in The Angels and movie producer friend Lauren Mann read Schrader’s script and thought it might interest Stapleton. The script included plenty of poker scenes and Mann sent it to him for some input.

“I read it and as a favor to her, I did a whole bunch of pages of notes,” he says. “I was like, ‘As my friend, I can’t let you make a poker movie that has this many sort of poker pitfalls in it.’ She sent the notes off to Paul and he was like, ‘We’ve got to hire this guy.’”

From there, Stapleton became the film’s poker consultant and helped iron out inconsistencies between Hollywood’s version of poker and the real thing.

“From the beginning, both Paul and the producers wanted to make the movie as authentic as possible,” he says. “Obviously not every suggestion I made got through, but almost everything did. They were really just super keen on making this something that poker players could at the very least see and not only point out where the poker went wrong, and be able to focus on the rest of the movie.”

What was one of the bigger flaws Stapleton had to work out with the production crew? The game’s jargon and vocabulary were the biggest concerns.

“As you can see from the end result of the movie, there’s a lot of talking about poker and a lot of dialogue,” Stapleton says, “so I had to make suggestions just over things of authenticity and the way that people speak.”

Beyond simply poker banter

Correcting poker language inconsistencies wasn’t Stapleton’s only concern. His role also went beyond just the mechanics of the game itself.

“It wasn’t just the writing where they wanted authenticity,” he says. “They wanted it to look authentic too, so I suggested locations, various wardrobe, (et cetera) … to try and make this look as authentic as possible.”

Stapleton even used some connections at Poker Night in America and D+B Publishing to appear in the movie. He hoped his role would give The Card Counter a real link to the modern poker world.

That even includes using WSOP logos. Overall, Stapleton enjoyed his consulting debut, but had to thread the needle of making suggestions while not stepping on toes.

“It was really fun,” he says. “I will say that it was incredibly stressful. I honestly didn’t even quite understand how revered Paul is as a filmmaker until much later.

“It was kind of stressful in that Paul’s trying to tell a story, Oscar Isaac and Tiffany Haddish are trying to act, and you’ve got me saying, ‘Hey guys, you keep saying gutshot but it’s really a flush.’ That kind of thing. It was just fun and terrifying at the same time.”

Spotlighting poker’s lower ranks

Many movies involving poker tend to gravitate to some of the game’s upper echelons and glitterati. Rounders focuses on Mike McDermott’s attempt to eventually make it big at the WSOP.

Molly’s Game featured Hollywood actors and elites playing for big money. Even Casino Royale has James Bond squaring off in a Texas Hold’em battle for millions.

The Card Counter took a different route, instead offering a glimpse into some of the game’s lower-level grinders. William Tell travels to cheap hotels battling it out on the WSOP Circuit.

“Initially, I think that Paul wanted the whole thing to be driving toward Las Vegas and the World Series,” Stapleton says. “Paul likes just to lay low (when filming), so doing these small daily tournaments we see (William Tell) popping into throughout the movie was definitely Paul’s idea. But to have him stay there was something we all kind of guided based on believability of the character and what we were going to be able to pull off visually.”

Recreating the WSOP stage in Las Vegas didn’t make sense from a practical or financial standpoint. The bright lights of Vegas didn’t seem to fit with the overall story.

Refining the film also meant not going overboard with exact poker lexicon. Tell isn’t a 20-something online pro. Stapelton tried to find some middle ground so the character’s dialogue doesn’t seem too hardcore poker.

“Just because this guy is a good poker player, doesn’t mean that he would know all of the terminology that young kids use who are the best poker players in the world,” he says. “The crowd that he runs with is the kind of crowd that sometimes gets things a little bit wrong in their rationale or in their use of poker terminology.”

FREE $20 GOLD COIN PACKAGE

With a Verified Account. PLUS get a $40 Gold Coin Package for $20 on purchase

US Players Accepted

Daily FREE Sweeps Coins Just For Logging In

Texas Hold’em Ring Games, Tourneys, and SNGs

Redeemable For Cash Prizes

Not a poker movie, just a good film

Movies involving poker rarely focus solely on the game. Poker can be used as a storytelling tool and also hold some symbolism for bigger meanings in life.

Stapleton was afraid there may not be enough poker for fans, although there is quite a bit of grinding it out. Poker itself can be fairly straightforward – the player either wins or loses, Stapleton says.

He’s hoping viewers will find a nice tale involving the game, but with bigger themes and simply a great movie.

“What I hope poker fans take away from it is much the same that I did – eventually I stopped caring about the poker and really cared about this character and what was going to happen,” he says. “I’m hoping the poker will get poker fans in the door, and then they’re going to realize that they just watched another Paul Schrader masterpiece.”

For USPoker’s interview with The Card Counter writer and director Paul Schrader, click here.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Joe Stapleton Helped Bring Poker Realism to New ‘Card Counter’ Film – nonenglishfeed

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631301636) } [3]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(72) "Why Bucky Could Let Captain America Die (But Cap Couldn’t Give Him Up)" ["link"]=> string(87) "https://bofads.com/why-bucky-could-let-captain-america-die-but-cap-couldnt-give-him-up/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:19:30 +0000" ["category"]=> string(44) "TrendingAmericaBuckyCapCaptainCouldntDieGive" ["guid"]=> string(87) "https://bofads.com/why-bucky-could-let-captain-america-die-but-cap-couldnt-give-him-up/" ["description"]=> string(704) "Though Captain America wouldn’t give up on Bucky in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, there’s a reason Bucky let Cap die in Marvel’s What If…?. Warning: This article contains spoilers for What If…? episode 5. In the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Captain America wouldn’t ever give up on Bucky Barnes; however, Marvel’s What If…? shows Bucky didn’t ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(9157) "

Though Captain America wouldn’t give up on Bucky in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, there’s a reason Bucky let Cap die in Marvel’s What If…?.

Warning: This article contains spoilers for What If…? episode 5.

In the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Captain America wouldn’t ever give up on Bucky Barnes; however, Marvel’s What If…? shows Bucky didn’t have the same problem when it came to Cap for various reasons. Zombies overrun the MCU in What If…? episode 5. After a zombie virus escapes from the Quantum Realm in the episode, it isn’t long before the Avengers get infected and doom the rest of society. With superpowered zombies on the loose, no one stands much of a chance to resist. Hope Van Dyne/Wasp (Evangeline Lilly), Happy Hogan (Jon Favreau), and Sharon Carter (Emily VanCamp) are among the characters who eventually join the undead. However, there is still hope for humankind in the MCU. By the end of the episode, the surviving heroes head to Wakanda with the Mind Stone to try to distribute a zombie cure.


Throughout the MCU, Captain America (Chris Evans) never gives up on Bucky (Sebastian Stan). The pair were best friends in Captain America: The First Avenger, and that love carried over into Bucky’s Winter Soldier days. In Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Cap takes a beating from the Winter Soldier after throwing down his shield in the name of friendship. He even defended Bucky in Captain America: Civil War when Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) discovered the Winter Soldier had killed his parents.

Related: Marvel Zombies Makes Spider-Man’s Star Wars Gag Worse

Bucky doesn’t repay Cap any favors in What If…? episode 5. Sebastian Stan returns to voice the Winter Soldier in the episode, and he eventually encounters a zombified Captain America (voiced by Josh Keaton). Though Cap would perhaps give Bucky the benefit of the doubt if faced with a similar situation, Bucky is quick to dispatch the zombie version of Captain America. Cap puts up a fight, even throwing his shield at Bucky. However, Bucky catches it and sends it right back, slicing his former friend in half. And there are several reasons why.

Bucky Winter Soldier in What If

Bucky does it for the greater good. Zombies are overtaking the world primarily due to the Avengers. Unfortunately, superheroes were responsible for the disease escaping from the Quantum Realm, and superpowered zombies quickly sped up the infection rate. Captain America will do nothing but kill more people, so Bucky recognizes he has to take him down. While it might’ve been nice for fans to see some remorse from Bucky, his military instincts and years of being hardened as the Winter Soldier kick into gear, allowing him to do what had to be done.

Also, there isn’t much hope for Cap. At this point in the episode, the Avengers haven’t discovered a zombie cure, so all Bucky has to work with is a mindless monster. While Cap can see the person underneath Bucky’s Winter Soldier, Bucky can’t see anything but Cap’s decomposing corpse trying to bite his face off. So in a way, Bucky wasn’t killing Steve. Cap already died a long time ago, and he has the skull-like face and rotting flesh to prove it.

More: The MCU Secretly Just Confirmed How Dangerous The Dark Avengers Will Be

Marvel’s What If…? releases new episodes Wednesdays on Disney+.

  • Eternals (2021)Release date: Nov 05, 2021
  • Spider-Man: No Way Home (2021)Release date: Dec 17, 2021
  • Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (2022)Release date: Mar 25, 2022
  • Thor: Love and Thunder (2022)Release date: May 06, 2022
  • Black Panther: Wakanda Forever/Black Panther 2 (2022)Release date: Jul 08, 2022
  • The Marvels/Captain Marvel 2 (2022)Release date: Nov 11, 2022
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania (2023)Release date: Feb 17, 2023
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 (2023)Release date: May 05, 2023

Fear the Walking Dead Season 7 Nuclear Landscape

Fear the Walking Dead Season 7 Trailer Teases An Apocalyptic Standoff


About The Author

" } ["summary"]=> string(704) "Though Captain America wouldn’t give up on Bucky in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, there’s a reason Bucky let Cap die in Marvel’s What If…?. Warning: This article contains spoilers for What If…? episode 5. In the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Captain America wouldn’t ever give up on Bucky Barnes; however, Marvel’s What If…? shows Bucky didn’t ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(9157) "

Though Captain America wouldn’t give up on Bucky in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, there’s a reason Bucky let Cap die in Marvel’s What If…?.

Warning: This article contains spoilers for What If…? episode 5.

In the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Captain America wouldn’t ever give up on Bucky Barnes; however, Marvel’s What If…? shows Bucky didn’t have the same problem when it came to Cap for various reasons. Zombies overrun the MCU in What If…? episode 5. After a zombie virus escapes from the Quantum Realm in the episode, it isn’t long before the Avengers get infected and doom the rest of society. With superpowered zombies on the loose, no one stands much of a chance to resist. Hope Van Dyne/Wasp (Evangeline Lilly), Happy Hogan (Jon Favreau), and Sharon Carter (Emily VanCamp) are among the characters who eventually join the undead. However, there is still hope for humankind in the MCU. By the end of the episode, the surviving heroes head to Wakanda with the Mind Stone to try to distribute a zombie cure.


Throughout the MCU, Captain America (Chris Evans) never gives up on Bucky (Sebastian Stan). The pair were best friends in Captain America: The First Avenger, and that love carried over into Bucky’s Winter Soldier days. In Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Cap takes a beating from the Winter Soldier after throwing down his shield in the name of friendship. He even defended Bucky in Captain America: Civil War when Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) discovered the Winter Soldier had killed his parents.

Related: Marvel Zombies Makes Spider-Man’s Star Wars Gag Worse

Bucky doesn’t repay Cap any favors in What If…? episode 5. Sebastian Stan returns to voice the Winter Soldier in the episode, and he eventually encounters a zombified Captain America (voiced by Josh Keaton). Though Cap would perhaps give Bucky the benefit of the doubt if faced with a similar situation, Bucky is quick to dispatch the zombie version of Captain America. Cap puts up a fight, even throwing his shield at Bucky. However, Bucky catches it and sends it right back, slicing his former friend in half. And there are several reasons why.

Bucky Winter Soldier in What If

Bucky does it for the greater good. Zombies are overtaking the world primarily due to the Avengers. Unfortunately, superheroes were responsible for the disease escaping from the Quantum Realm, and superpowered zombies quickly sped up the infection rate. Captain America will do nothing but kill more people, so Bucky recognizes he has to take him down. While it might’ve been nice for fans to see some remorse from Bucky, his military instincts and years of being hardened as the Winter Soldier kick into gear, allowing him to do what had to be done.

Also, there isn’t much hope for Cap. At this point in the episode, the Avengers haven’t discovered a zombie cure, so all Bucky has to work with is a mindless monster. While Cap can see the person underneath Bucky’s Winter Soldier, Bucky can’t see anything but Cap’s decomposing corpse trying to bite his face off. So in a way, Bucky wasn’t killing Steve. Cap already died a long time ago, and he has the skull-like face and rotting flesh to prove it.

More: The MCU Secretly Just Confirmed How Dangerous The Dark Avengers Will Be

Marvel’s What If…? releases new episodes Wednesdays on Disney+.

  • Eternals (2021)Release date: Nov 05, 2021
  • Spider-Man: No Way Home (2021)Release date: Dec 17, 2021
  • Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (2022)Release date: Mar 25, 2022
  • Thor: Love and Thunder (2022)Release date: May 06, 2022
  • Black Panther: Wakanda Forever/Black Panther 2 (2022)Release date: Jul 08, 2022
  • The Marvels/Captain Marvel 2 (2022)Release date: Nov 11, 2022
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania (2023)Release date: Feb 17, 2023
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 (2023)Release date: May 05, 2023

Fear the Walking Dead Season 7 Nuclear Landscape

Fear the Walking Dead Season 7 Trailer Teases An Apocalyptic Standoff


About The Author

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631301570) } [4]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(74) "The National Theatre Adds New Productions To Streaming Platform NT At Home" ["link"]=> string(94) "https://bofads.com/the-national-theatre-adds-new-productions-to-streaming-platform-nt-at-home/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:17:51 +0000" ["category"]=> string(59) "TrendingaddshomeNationalplatformProductionsStreamingTheatre" ["guid"]=> string(94) "https://bofads.com/the-national-theatre-adds-new-productions-to-streaming-platform-nt-at-home/" ["description"]=> string(700) "The National Theatre has today announced the latest productions to be made available on its National Theatre at Home streaming platform. Launching today, the Young Vic and Joshua Andrews’ production of Tennessee Williams’ timeless masterpiece A Streetcar Named Desire featuring Gillian Anderson as Blanche DuBois, Ben Foster as Stanley and Vanessa Kirby as Stella, the ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(3064) "

The National Theatre has today announced the latest productions to be made available on its National Theatre at Home streaming platform. Launching today, the Young Vic and Joshua Andrews’ production of Tennessee Williams’ timeless masterpiece A Streetcar Named Desire featuring Gillian Anderson as Blanche DuBois, Ben Foster as Stanley and Vanessa Kirby as Stella, the NT’s recent production of Dylan Thomas’ Under Milk Wood with Michael Sheen and Nadia Fall’s verbatim play Home that explores homelessness in the UK featuring Michaela Coel.

New productions are added each month and since launching in December 2020, there are now 31 productions available to stream on the platform.

It is also announced today some of the productions that audiences can expect to see on the platform in the coming months. Those productions are confirmed to include Antony & Cleopatra with Ralph Fiennes and Sophie Okonedo in the title roles; Hedda Gabler with Ruth Wilson in the title role; Caryl Churchill’s Top Girls in the Lyttelton theatre from 2019; Sally Cookson’s 2017 production of Peter Pan; Yaël Farber’s Salomé and James Graham’s political drama This House, alongside current NT Productions; Kae Tempest’s Paradise with Lesley Sharp and Winsome Pinnock’s Rockets and Blue Lights. Ian McKellen on Stage will also join the platform this autumn for audiences outside the UK and Ireland. It is currently available in the UK and Ireland for Amazon Prime subscribers.

Under Milk Wood and A Streetcar Named Desire will also be available from today with audio-description to support blind and partially sighted audiences worldwide. There are now 19 National Theatre at Home titles available with audio-description. All productions on National Theatre at Home are available with captions.

National Theatre at Home is available at ntathome.com, with single titles available from £5.99 – £8.99, a monthly subscription for £9.99 or a yearly subscription for £99.99. 

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
The National Theatre Adds New Productions To Streaming Platform NT At Home

" } ["summary"]=> string(700) "The National Theatre has today announced the latest productions to be made available on its National Theatre at Home streaming platform. Launching today, the Young Vic and Joshua Andrews’ production of Tennessee Williams’ timeless masterpiece A Streetcar Named Desire featuring Gillian Anderson as Blanche DuBois, Ben Foster as Stanley and Vanessa Kirby as Stella, the ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(3064) "

The National Theatre has today announced the latest productions to be made available on its National Theatre at Home streaming platform. Launching today, the Young Vic and Joshua Andrews’ production of Tennessee Williams’ timeless masterpiece A Streetcar Named Desire featuring Gillian Anderson as Blanche DuBois, Ben Foster as Stanley and Vanessa Kirby as Stella, the NT’s recent production of Dylan Thomas’ Under Milk Wood with Michael Sheen and Nadia Fall’s verbatim play Home that explores homelessness in the UK featuring Michaela Coel.

New productions are added each month and since launching in December 2020, there are now 31 productions available to stream on the platform.

It is also announced today some of the productions that audiences can expect to see on the platform in the coming months. Those productions are confirmed to include Antony & Cleopatra with Ralph Fiennes and Sophie Okonedo in the title roles; Hedda Gabler with Ruth Wilson in the title role; Caryl Churchill’s Top Girls in the Lyttelton theatre from 2019; Sally Cookson’s 2017 production of Peter Pan; Yaël Farber’s Salomé and James Graham’s political drama This House, alongside current NT Productions; Kae Tempest’s Paradise with Lesley Sharp and Winsome Pinnock’s Rockets and Blue Lights. Ian McKellen on Stage will also join the platform this autumn for audiences outside the UK and Ireland. It is currently available in the UK and Ireland for Amazon Prime subscribers.

Under Milk Wood and A Streetcar Named Desire will also be available from today with audio-description to support blind and partially sighted audiences worldwide. There are now 19 National Theatre at Home titles available with audio-description. All productions on National Theatre at Home are available with captions.

National Theatre at Home is available at ntathome.com, with single titles available from £5.99 – £8.99, a monthly subscription for £9.99 or a yearly subscription for £99.99. 

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
The National Theatre Adds New Productions To Streaming Platform NT At Home

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631301471) } [5]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(62) "Chris Hemsworth Shares Workout He Doing For ‘Extraction 2’" ["link"]=> string(76) "https://bofads.com/chris-hemsworth-shares-workout-he-doing-for-extraction-2/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:16:41 +0000" ["category"]=> string(182) "TrendingChrischris hemsworth took to instagram to share a hiit workout he's doing to get in shape for the sequel to his hit netflix film 'extraction'.ExtractionHemsworthSharesWorkout" ["guid"]=> string(76) "https://bofads.com/chris-hemsworth-shares-workout-he-doing-for-extraction-2/" ["description"]=> string(606) "Netflix Given the release of The Matrix: Resurrections trailer, I’ve spent some time this week thinking about Keanu Reeves’ place in the history of action movie stars, as his core four entries — Point Break, Speed, The Matrix, and John Wick — is as strong as they come. Not only is he a first-ballot Hall ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(5613) "

Netflix

Given the release of The Matrix: Resurrections trailer, I’ve spent some time this week thinking about Keanu Reeves’ place in the history of action movie stars, as his core four entries — Point Break, Speed, The Matrix, and John Wick — is as strong as they come. Not only is he a first-ballot Hall of Famer, but an argument can now be made he’s the greatest action star of his generation. While Tom Cruise is certainly in the conversation, particularly given his sheer volume of action movies, I’m not sure his quality of franchise/film is quite as high. But that’s another discussion for another day.

My point is that as I was pondering an action movie star Hall of Fame, I came up with the following rough draft list of first-ballot entries:

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sylvester Stallone, Bruce Lee, Harrison Ford, Bruce Willis, Jackie Chan, Tom Cruise, Liam Neeson, Keanu Reeves, The Rock, Jason Statham, Charlize Theron, Sigourney Weaver, Zoe Saldana

Which then lead me to my next thought: who are the potential future Hall of Famers? Chris Hemsworth was one of those names (as was Vin Diesel, Dave Bautista, and Scarlett Johansson).

Obviously best known for his role as Thor, Hemsworth’s God of Thunder will become the first and only character (so far) to get a fourth solo film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. That in and of itself, given the record-shattering nature of the MCU, is a future Hall of Famer-worthy accomplishment.

Hemsworth’s also got the Extraction franchise over on Netflix, which *could* turn into something special if the sequel manages to be better than the original. Don’t get me wrong, I really enjoyed the first Extraction, but if Hemsworth is going to start to put together a Hall of Fame resume, he needs to start building out an iconic character/franchise outside of the comforts of Marvel, and that begins with making Extraction a household name.

Originally released on April 24, 2020, Extraction broke all sorts of viewership records for Netflix, leading the streaming giant to greenlight a sequel almost immediately. And if Chris Hemsworth’s training for the role is any indication, Extraction 2 is going to be bigger and better than the first.

If you haven’t seen Extraction, go check it out on Netflix — it’s a mix of John Wick, The Raid, and a classic behind-enemy-lines story.

Subscribe and listen to our pop culture podcast, the Post-Credit Podcast, and follow us on Twitter @PostCredPod

(Apple | Spotify | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | Anchor)

.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Chris Hemsworth Shares Workout He Doing For ‘Extraction 2’

" } ["summary"]=> string(606) "Netflix Given the release of The Matrix: Resurrections trailer, I’ve spent some time this week thinking about Keanu Reeves’ place in the history of action movie stars, as his core four entries — Point Break, Speed, The Matrix, and John Wick — is as strong as they come. Not only is he a first-ballot Hall ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(5613) "

Netflix

Given the release of The Matrix: Resurrections trailer, I’ve spent some time this week thinking about Keanu Reeves’ place in the history of action movie stars, as his core four entries — Point Break, Speed, The Matrix, and John Wick — is as strong as they come. Not only is he a first-ballot Hall of Famer, but an argument can now be made he’s the greatest action star of his generation. While Tom Cruise is certainly in the conversation, particularly given his sheer volume of action movies, I’m not sure his quality of franchise/film is quite as high. But that’s another discussion for another day.

My point is that as I was pondering an action movie star Hall of Fame, I came up with the following rough draft list of first-ballot entries:

Arnold Schwarzenegger, Sylvester Stallone, Bruce Lee, Harrison Ford, Bruce Willis, Jackie Chan, Tom Cruise, Liam Neeson, Keanu Reeves, The Rock, Jason Statham, Charlize Theron, Sigourney Weaver, Zoe Saldana

Which then lead me to my next thought: who are the potential future Hall of Famers? Chris Hemsworth was one of those names (as was Vin Diesel, Dave Bautista, and Scarlett Johansson).

Obviously best known for his role as Thor, Hemsworth’s God of Thunder will become the first and only character (so far) to get a fourth solo film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. That in and of itself, given the record-shattering nature of the MCU, is a future Hall of Famer-worthy accomplishment.

Hemsworth’s also got the Extraction franchise over on Netflix, which *could* turn into something special if the sequel manages to be better than the original. Don’t get me wrong, I really enjoyed the first Extraction, but if Hemsworth is going to start to put together a Hall of Fame resume, he needs to start building out an iconic character/franchise outside of the comforts of Marvel, and that begins with making Extraction a household name.

Originally released on April 24, 2020, Extraction broke all sorts of viewership records for Netflix, leading the streaming giant to greenlight a sequel almost immediately. And if Chris Hemsworth’s training for the role is any indication, Extraction 2 is going to be bigger and better than the first.

If you haven’t seen Extraction, go check it out on Netflix — it’s a mix of John Wick, The Raid, and a classic behind-enemy-lines story.

Subscribe and listen to our pop culture podcast, the Post-Credit Podcast, and follow us on Twitter @PostCredPod

(Apple | Spotify | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | Anchor)

.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Chris Hemsworth Shares Workout He Doing For ‘Extraction 2’

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631301401) } [6]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(57) "Emma Drummond and Dale Roberts appointed to Ausfilm board" ["link"]=> string(77) "https://bofads.com/emma-drummond-and-dale-roberts-appointed-to-ausfilm-board/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:15:05 +0000" ["category"]=> string(70) "Movie Production CompaniesappointedAusfilmboardDaleDrummondEmmaRoberts" ["guid"]=> string(77) "https://bofads.com/emma-drummond-and-dale-roberts-appointed-to-ausfilm-board/" ["description"]=> string(613) "Animal Logic group head of legal and business affairs Emma Drummond and KOJO Studios managing director Dale Roberts have been announced as new members of the Ausfilm board. It comes following the departure of deputy chair Zareh Nalbandian, CEO of Animal Logic, after nine years of service, and Tony Clark, Rising Sun Pictures managing director, ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(4514) "

Animal Logic group head of legal and business affairs Emma Drummond and KOJO Studios managing director Dale Roberts have been announced as new members of the Ausfilm board.

It comes following the departure of deputy chair Zareh Nalbandian, CEO of Animal Logic, after nine years of service, and Tony Clark, Rising Sun Pictures managing director, who was on the board for 12 years.

Drummond has experience across a variety of different sectors in Australia and the UK, including international film and TV financing, animation and visual effects, intellectual property, media and technology, banking and finance, and commercial law.

She said she was honoured to have the opportunity to use her knowledge and experience in supporting the work of Ausfilm and its members.

“Ausfilm’s work is culturally and economically important to the ongoing sustainability of Australia’s creative industries in a competitive global marketplace,” she said.

Roberts has been a director and board member at KOJO Studios since first joining the company in 1996 and has since held numerous senior management positions at the company.

He was appointed managing [artner in June 2011, CEO in January 2013, and in July 2019 was appointed managing director. He is also a member of the Young Presidents Organisation (YPO), a global network of CEOs with approximately 24,000 members across 130 countries.

Sam Mostyn.

Speaking about his appointment, Roberts said he was grateful to join the Ausfilm board as a representative of the members and champion the country’s screen industry on the international stage.

“I hope to provide some insight and experience into how our members are evolving their business strategies and operating models to be best placed to flourish in the years ahead,” he said.

The Ausfilm board includes Sam Mostyn (chair), John Hughes (Fox Studios Australia), Lynne Benzie (Village Roadshow Studios), and Nerissa Kavanagh (Blackbird VFX), as well as screen agency board members Graeme Mason (Screen Australia), Caroline Pitcher (Film Victoria), Grainne Brunsdon (Screen NSW), Kylie Munnich (Screen Queensland), Rikki Lea Bestall (Screenwest) and Kate Croser (South Australian Film Corporation).

Mostyn said both Drummond and Roberts brought a great deal of expertise and experience to the board.

“Emma has exceptional broad sector experience, across government and commercial roles, operating across global jurisdictions in the media, tech and entertainment industries, and brings a wealth of insight across business affairs and government incentive programs,” she said.

“Dale is a creative and strategic business executive who has been integral in the growth and success of KOJO Studios over the past two decades.”

Ausfilm CEO Kate Marks paid tribute to the board’s departing members for their many years of dedicated service.

“Tony and Zareh have been long-serving and valued supporters of the Australian film and TV industry, and as members of the Ausfilm board,” she said.

“On behalf of Ausfilm members, we sincerely thank them for their outstanding contribution, dedicated commitment to the membership of Ausfilm, the industry, Ausfilm’s governance, and strategy, and the success of the organisation over many years.”

Roberts and Drummond commenced their board terms in August.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Emma Drummond and Dale Roberts appointed to Ausfilm board

" } ["summary"]=> string(613) "Animal Logic group head of legal and business affairs Emma Drummond and KOJO Studios managing director Dale Roberts have been announced as new members of the Ausfilm board. It comes following the departure of deputy chair Zareh Nalbandian, CEO of Animal Logic, after nine years of service, and Tony Clark, Rising Sun Pictures managing director, ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(4514) "

Animal Logic group head of legal and business affairs Emma Drummond and KOJO Studios managing director Dale Roberts have been announced as new members of the Ausfilm board.

It comes following the departure of deputy chair Zareh Nalbandian, CEO of Animal Logic, after nine years of service, and Tony Clark, Rising Sun Pictures managing director, who was on the board for 12 years.

Drummond has experience across a variety of different sectors in Australia and the UK, including international film and TV financing, animation and visual effects, intellectual property, media and technology, banking and finance, and commercial law.

She said she was honoured to have the opportunity to use her knowledge and experience in supporting the work of Ausfilm and its members.

“Ausfilm’s work is culturally and economically important to the ongoing sustainability of Australia’s creative industries in a competitive global marketplace,” she said.

Roberts has been a director and board member at KOJO Studios since first joining the company in 1996 and has since held numerous senior management positions at the company.

He was appointed managing [artner in June 2011, CEO in January 2013, and in July 2019 was appointed managing director. He is also a member of the Young Presidents Organisation (YPO), a global network of CEOs with approximately 24,000 members across 130 countries.

Sam Mostyn.

Speaking about his appointment, Roberts said he was grateful to join the Ausfilm board as a representative of the members and champion the country’s screen industry on the international stage.

“I hope to provide some insight and experience into how our members are evolving their business strategies and operating models to be best placed to flourish in the years ahead,” he said.

The Ausfilm board includes Sam Mostyn (chair), John Hughes (Fox Studios Australia), Lynne Benzie (Village Roadshow Studios), and Nerissa Kavanagh (Blackbird VFX), as well as screen agency board members Graeme Mason (Screen Australia), Caroline Pitcher (Film Victoria), Grainne Brunsdon (Screen NSW), Kylie Munnich (Screen Queensland), Rikki Lea Bestall (Screenwest) and Kate Croser (South Australian Film Corporation).

Mostyn said both Drummond and Roberts brought a great deal of expertise and experience to the board.

“Emma has exceptional broad sector experience, across government and commercial roles, operating across global jurisdictions in the media, tech and entertainment industries, and brings a wealth of insight across business affairs and government incentive programs,” she said.

“Dale is a creative and strategic business executive who has been integral in the growth and success of KOJO Studios over the past two decades.”

Ausfilm CEO Kate Marks paid tribute to the board’s departing members for their many years of dedicated service.

“Tony and Zareh have been long-serving and valued supporters of the Australian film and TV industry, and as members of the Ausfilm board,” she said.

“On behalf of Ausfilm members, we sincerely thank them for their outstanding contribution, dedicated commitment to the membership of Ausfilm, the industry, Ausfilm’s governance, and strategy, and the success of the organisation over many years.”

Roberts and Drummond commenced their board terms in August.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Emma Drummond and Dale Roberts appointed to Ausfilm board

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631301305) } [7]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(81) "Franklin Eugene Makes Impactful First Public Appearance Since Arrival of COVID-19" ["link"]=> string(101) "https://bofads.com/franklin-eugene-makes-impactful-first-public-appearance-since-arrival-of-covid-19/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:10:12 +0000" ["category"]=> string(115) "Movie Production Companiesaccessed here.appearanceArrivalCOVID19EugeneFranklinIMDB hereImpactfulpublicwebsite here." ["guid"]=> string(101) "https://bofads.com/franklin-eugene-makes-impactful-first-public-appearance-since-arrival-of-covid-19/" ["description"]=> string(744) "Franklin Eugene Franklin Eugene with Alberta Ferretti_Alberto Barbera _Cynthia Erivo at the 78th Venice Film Festival International activist and artist arrives at the 78th Venice International Film Festival championing women’s rights and general inclusivity in the film industry USA & UK, September 8, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Franklin Eugene has finally emerged after the global pandemic, ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(9989) "

Franklin Eugene

Franklin Eugene with Alberta Ferretti_Alberto Barbera _Cynthia Erivo at the 78th Venice Film Festival

International activist and artist arrives at the 78th Venice International Film Festival championing women’s rights and general inclusivity in the film industry

USA & UK, September 8, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Franklin Eugene has finally emerged after the global pandemic, and can be found continuing his fierce advocacy of women and inclusion in the film industry at the 78th Venice International Film Festival taking place this week. He graced the Sala Grande Red Carpet at the Palazzo del Cinema ahead of the out-of-competition world premiere of “Dune”, directed by Denis Villeneuve. Images from the event can be accessed here.

As a notable supporter for diversity and a proponent of representing all voices in art, Mr. Eugene made his presence known at the Annual Seminar on Gender Equality and Inclusivity in the Film Industry. Held at Hotel Excelsior at Venice Production Bridge, Mr. Eugene participated in a discussion that included talented panelists such as Roberto Cicutto, President of La Biennale di Venezia; Alberto Barbera, Artistic Director of Mostra Internazionale d’Arte Cinematografica at La Biennale di Venezia; Enrico Vannucci, Deputy Executive Director of Eurimages; Iole Maria Giannattasio, Ministry of Culture at Directorate General Cinema and Audivo Visual; and Mariagrazia Fanchi, Director of Alta Scuola in Media Comunicazione e Spettacolo dell’Università Cattolica di Milano; among many others. The presentation focused on sharing current relevant data on the issue at hand and discussing potential solutions to elicit a greater presence of women at every level of the entire film industry, festivals included.

Of the event, Mr. Eugene noted, “While strides have been made for women and inclusion of historically marginalized people in front of the camera, we continue to see great need for a tremendous amount of work to be done. In the motion picture drama space, data has revealed that behind the camera, contributions from Black, Asian and minorities in general had fallen from 8.6% in 2018-19 to 5.9% in 2019-20. Additionally, there has been a decrease in the contributions from women in senior roles. This is a tragedy for the industry and arts as a whole.”

Further, Mr. Eugene added luster to the Women in Film Event at the Hotel Excelsior, where he attended as a featured invited guest of Cultured Focus Television Network. The event featured an awards ceremony where notable women who have made indelible contributions in the areas of film and fashion were recognized. The significant fashion designer and businesswoman extraordinaire Alberta Ferretti received the highest honor of the night. During the event, Mr. Eugene was interviewed by various international journalists, to whom he continued the conversation by stressing the need to open the film industry space for women and marginalized voices. “We need look no farther than films like ‘Mona Lisa and the Blood Moon’ to see our significant progress in this space. This film is written and directed by the incredible Ana Lily Amirpour, and the four pivotal roles are performed by Jeon Jong-seo, Kate Hudson, Craig Robinson, and Evan Whitten,” Eugene touted. “However, film crews and the business industry that supported the very filming of this masterpiece still have a dearth of female and minority representation.”

Ahead of the “Mona Lisa and the Blood Moon” screening, Mr. Eugene liaised with the incomparable Cynthia Erivo. Erivo is an English actress, singer and songwriter. She is the recipient of several accolades, including a Daytime Emmy Award, a Grammy Award, and a Tony Award, in addition to nominations for two Academy Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, and a Screen Actors Guild Award. “Cynthia’s humanity is as big as her talent. Her talent is beyond extraordinary,” stated Mr. Eugene. “Cynthia, like the people of the world, I adore you. We will continue to fight for inclusion of those normally forgotten in front and behind the camera.” In Venice Biennale’s tradition of inclusion, Ms. Erivo is a member of the festival jury this year.

Franklin Eugene has voiced that he will remain committed to supporting the movement to amplify more marginalized voices as the Venice International Film Festival comes to a close, “The conversation centered around the need to improve Hollywood in the film industry is as old as the industry itself. Not only is diversity and inclusion good for business, but it ensures all perspectives and contexts are being embraced as both important and necessary to the broader cultural discussion. In order to move forward and truly capture the state of the world today, there needs to be representation of sex and race on every level.”

About Franklin Eugene:
Franklin Eugene is a business professional, internationally awarded fashion designer, film producer, Global Patron of the Arts, and activist. He has been a producer on many films including “Love Gilda” and “The Shepherd”. “Love Gilda” is the extraordinary documentary feature that shares the life of comic icon Gilda Radner. “Love Gilda” opened the 2018 Tribeca International Film Festival, and was nominated for two Emmy Awards in June 2019. “The Shepherd” has received over 30 International film awards and is currently streaming on Netflix. To learn more about Franklin Eugene, access his IMDB here, and his website here.

About Cultured Focus Television Network:
Cultured Focus Network is a new and innovative platform, introduced to offer internet streaming content internationally for television programs, movies, music, interviews and more, thus acting as an Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) and Over-the-Top (OTT) Provider. Additionally, the Cultured Focus Network offers on-demand video content and linear TV programming. Cultured Focus Network is an expansion of the Cultured Focus Magazine platform, an entertainment news magazine founded in 2017 that provides trending news in arts and culture globally. Cultured Focus Network’s extensive programming provides top-grade, comprehensive content to provide a range of artistic perspectives to viewers. The network also welcomes independent filmmakers, musicians and video content creators to submit their projects to the company for consideration. You can learn more about the Cultured Focus Television Network by visiting their website here:
https://culturedfocusnetwork.com/

Franklin Eugene
Franklin Eugene International LLC
info@franklineugene.com

.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Franklin Eugene Makes Impactful First Public Appearance Since Arrival of COVID-19

" } ["summary"]=> string(744) "Franklin Eugene Franklin Eugene with Alberta Ferretti_Alberto Barbera _Cynthia Erivo at the 78th Venice Film Festival International activist and artist arrives at the 78th Venice International Film Festival championing women’s rights and general inclusivity in the film industry USA & UK, September 8, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Franklin Eugene has finally emerged after the global pandemic, ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(9989) "

Franklin Eugene

Franklin Eugene with Alberta Ferretti_Alberto Barbera _Cynthia Erivo at the 78th Venice Film Festival

International activist and artist arrives at the 78th Venice International Film Festival championing women’s rights and general inclusivity in the film industry

USA & UK, September 8, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Franklin Eugene has finally emerged after the global pandemic, and can be found continuing his fierce advocacy of women and inclusion in the film industry at the 78th Venice International Film Festival taking place this week. He graced the Sala Grande Red Carpet at the Palazzo del Cinema ahead of the out-of-competition world premiere of “Dune”, directed by Denis Villeneuve. Images from the event can be accessed here.

As a notable supporter for diversity and a proponent of representing all voices in art, Mr. Eugene made his presence known at the Annual Seminar on Gender Equality and Inclusivity in the Film Industry. Held at Hotel Excelsior at Venice Production Bridge, Mr. Eugene participated in a discussion that included talented panelists such as Roberto Cicutto, President of La Biennale di Venezia; Alberto Barbera, Artistic Director of Mostra Internazionale d’Arte Cinematografica at La Biennale di Venezia; Enrico Vannucci, Deputy Executive Director of Eurimages; Iole Maria Giannattasio, Ministry of Culture at Directorate General Cinema and Audivo Visual; and Mariagrazia Fanchi, Director of Alta Scuola in Media Comunicazione e Spettacolo dell’Università Cattolica di Milano; among many others. The presentation focused on sharing current relevant data on the issue at hand and discussing potential solutions to elicit a greater presence of women at every level of the entire film industry, festivals included.

Of the event, Mr. Eugene noted, “While strides have been made for women and inclusion of historically marginalized people in front of the camera, we continue to see great need for a tremendous amount of work to be done. In the motion picture drama space, data has revealed that behind the camera, contributions from Black, Asian and minorities in general had fallen from 8.6% in 2018-19 to 5.9% in 2019-20. Additionally, there has been a decrease in the contributions from women in senior roles. This is a tragedy for the industry and arts as a whole.”

Further, Mr. Eugene added luster to the Women in Film Event at the Hotel Excelsior, where he attended as a featured invited guest of Cultured Focus Television Network. The event featured an awards ceremony where notable women who have made indelible contributions in the areas of film and fashion were recognized. The significant fashion designer and businesswoman extraordinaire Alberta Ferretti received the highest honor of the night. During the event, Mr. Eugene was interviewed by various international journalists, to whom he continued the conversation by stressing the need to open the film industry space for women and marginalized voices. “We need look no farther than films like ‘Mona Lisa and the Blood Moon’ to see our significant progress in this space. This film is written and directed by the incredible Ana Lily Amirpour, and the four pivotal roles are performed by Jeon Jong-seo, Kate Hudson, Craig Robinson, and Evan Whitten,” Eugene touted. “However, film crews and the business industry that supported the very filming of this masterpiece still have a dearth of female and minority representation.”

Ahead of the “Mona Lisa and the Blood Moon” screening, Mr. Eugene liaised with the incomparable Cynthia Erivo. Erivo is an English actress, singer and songwriter. She is the recipient of several accolades, including a Daytime Emmy Award, a Grammy Award, and a Tony Award, in addition to nominations for two Academy Awards, two Golden Globe Awards, and a Screen Actors Guild Award. “Cynthia’s humanity is as big as her talent. Her talent is beyond extraordinary,” stated Mr. Eugene. “Cynthia, like the people of the world, I adore you. We will continue to fight for inclusion of those normally forgotten in front and behind the camera.” In Venice Biennale’s tradition of inclusion, Ms. Erivo is a member of the festival jury this year.

Franklin Eugene has voiced that he will remain committed to supporting the movement to amplify more marginalized voices as the Venice International Film Festival comes to a close, “The conversation centered around the need to improve Hollywood in the film industry is as old as the industry itself. Not only is diversity and inclusion good for business, but it ensures all perspectives and contexts are being embraced as both important and necessary to the broader cultural discussion. In order to move forward and truly capture the state of the world today, there needs to be representation of sex and race on every level.”

About Franklin Eugene:
Franklin Eugene is a business professional, internationally awarded fashion designer, film producer, Global Patron of the Arts, and activist. He has been a producer on many films including “Love Gilda” and “The Shepherd”. “Love Gilda” is the extraordinary documentary feature that shares the life of comic icon Gilda Radner. “Love Gilda” opened the 2018 Tribeca International Film Festival, and was nominated for two Emmy Awards in June 2019. “The Shepherd” has received over 30 International film awards and is currently streaming on Netflix. To learn more about Franklin Eugene, access his IMDB here, and his website here.

About Cultured Focus Television Network:
Cultured Focus Network is a new and innovative platform, introduced to offer internet streaming content internationally for television programs, movies, music, interviews and more, thus acting as an Internet Protocol Television (IPTV) and Over-the-Top (OTT) Provider. Additionally, the Cultured Focus Network offers on-demand video content and linear TV programming. Cultured Focus Network is an expansion of the Cultured Focus Magazine platform, an entertainment news magazine founded in 2017 that provides trending news in arts and culture globally. Cultured Focus Network’s extensive programming provides top-grade, comprehensive content to provide a range of artistic perspectives to viewers. The network also welcomes independent filmmakers, musicians and video content creators to submit their projects to the company for consideration. You can learn more about the Cultured Focus Television Network by visiting their website here:
https://culturedfocusnetwork.com/

Franklin Eugene
Franklin Eugene International LLC
info@franklineugene.com

.

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
Franklin Eugene Makes Impactful First Public Appearance Since Arrival of COVID-19

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631301012) } [8]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(59) "Language Log: Mailbag: comparative communication efficiency" ["link"]=> string(77) "https://bofads.com/language-log-mailbag-comparative-communication-efficiency/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:09:13 +0000" ["category"]=> string(21) "Health & Science News" ["guid"]=> string(77) "https://bofads.com/language-log-mailbag-comparative-communication-efficiency/" ["description"]=> string(682) "Mailbag: comparative communication efficiency In yesterday’s post on “Comparing communication efficiency across languages“, I compared the sizes of the English and Chinese sides of parallel (i.e. translated) text corpora, and observed that English seems to require 20-40% more bits to express the same information, even after the application of compression techniques that ought to eliminate ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(11568) "

Mailbag: comparative communication efficiency

In yesterday’s post on “Comparing communication efficiency across languages“, I compared the sizes of the English and Chinese sides of parallel (i.e. translated) text corpora, and observed that English seems to require 20-40% more bits to express the same information, even after the application of compression techniques that ought to eliminate most of the superficial and local reasons for such a difference. Bob Moore sent an interesting comment:

I can think of at least couple of reasons that might explain how there can appear to be a difference between the communication efficiency of two languages. One suggests that it might only be apparent; the other explains why it might be real.

Bob’s first suggestion, about how to explain the difference away:

First, I would not trust gzip to yield an accurate measure of the information content of a given text. You probably recall that Peter Brown et al. showed in their 1992 CL paper on the entropy of English that a simple tri-gram language model yields more than twice the compression of standard text compression algorithms, 1.75 bits per character vs. more than 4 bits per character. Furthermore, If memory serves, the Shannon game of guessing the next character yields a number of around 1 bit per character for English, if there is a human brain in the loop. Playing the Shannon game with the two sides of a bilingual corpus might produce a more accurate comparison than gzip.

I agree that gzip doesn’t distill all the redundancy out of text, though it’s a lot better than compress, which is the algorithm that produced the estimate of “more than 4 bits per character” — the output of compress is about 85% larger on standard test corpora than the output of gzip, which in turn is about 20% larger than szip, and about 43% larger than SBC on standard test corpora. But we’re looking at a comparison of information content between two sources, and that should be somewhat better estimated by standard compression techniques (even older ones like gzip), especially with respect to local factors.

Take a look at these tables from Balkenhol and Kurz, “Universal Data Compression Based on the Burrows-Wheeler Transformation”, IEEE Transactions on Computers, 49(10), 2000), comparing compression rates for different algorithms across the text files in two standard test corpora. The antique compress algorithm yields file sizes more than twice those of BK98, and gzip gives sizes about 15-20%  greater — but the bits-per-character values for different subcorpora are highly correlated across algorithms (e.g. r=0.96 between gzip and BK98 across the various files in the Calgary corpus):

While we’re on the subject, let me recommend to you the classical references that Bob cites. The trigram model reference is Peter Brown, Vincent Della Pietra, Robert Mercer, Stephen Della Pietra, and Jennifer Lai, “An estimate of an upper bound for the entropy of English“, Computational Linguistics, 18(1): 31-40, 1992. And while their model is “simple” compared to some other things one might think of, there’s actually quite a bit to it. It models English in four stochastic steps:

1. It generates a hidden string of tokens using a token trigram model.
2. It generates a spelling for each token.
3. It generates a case for each spelling.
4. It generates a spacing string to separate cased spellings from one another.

A genuinely “simple” trigram model, in which case, spelling and spacing were simply handled by multiplying the number of tokens, would not have done as well.

In their paper’s famous conclusion, Brown et al. take care to note all the things that they are leaving out:

From a loftier perspective, we cannot help but notice that linguistically the trigram concept, which is the workhorse of our language model, seems almost moronic. It captures local tactic constraints by sheer force of numbers, but the more well-protected bastions of semantic, pragmatic, and discourse constraint and even morphological and global syntactic constraint remain unscathed, in fact unnoticed. Surely the extensive
work on these topics in recent years can be harnessed to predict English better than we have yet predicted it.

We see this paper as a gauntlet thrown down before the computational linguistics community. The Brown Corpus is a widely available, standard corpus and the subject of much linguistic research. By predicting the corpus character by character, we obviate the need for a common agreement on a vocabulary. Given a model, the computations required to determine the cross-entropy are within reach for even a modest research budget. We hope by proposing this standard task to unleash a fury of competitive energy that will gradually corral the wild and unruly thing that we know the English language to be.

The history of efforts to estimate the entropy of English by asking human to guess the next character in a text begins with another one of Bob’s references: Claude Shannon, “Prediction and entropy of printed English“, Bell System Technical Journal ,30:50-64, 1951. Shannon came up with a range of 0.6 to 1.3 bits per character.

A quarter century later, Cover and King (“A convergent gambling estimate of the entropy of English“, IEEE Transactions on Information Theory”, 24(4):413-421, 1978) used a slightly different technique to sharpen the estimate to 1.25-1.35 bits per character.

Unfortunately, the Shannon/Cover-King results are not strictly comparable to the Brown et al. results, nor to the other algorithmic compression-rate results. The experiments test on different texts, deal with various formatting issues in different ways, estimate entropy by different methods — and especially, they have radically different standards for how to amortize the entropy of the “dictionary” and other prior knowledge involved. The techniques based on human guessing don’t add any cost for transmitting knowledge of English (as opposed to Chinese or French or whatever); the same is basically true of the Brown et al. study, as I recall, since they simply base their estimate on the cross-entropy of the test text given the model, without any provision for transmitting the model. In contrast, the other algorithmic compression techniques start out equally ready to compress text from any source, and must build up and encode their expectations incrementally in the compressed output.

Anyhow, I think that modern compression techniques should be able to remove most of the obvious and simple reasons for differences in document size among translations in different languages, like different spacing or spelling conventions. If there are residual differences among languages, this either relates to redundancies that are not being modeled — along the lines sketched in Brown et al.’s conclusion — or it reflects a different sort of difference between languages and cultures, which Bob Moore picks up in his second point:

Second, why should we expect two languages to use the same number of bits to convey the same thoughts? I believe that when we speak or write we always simplify the complexity of what is actually in our heads, and different languages might implicitly do this more than others. Applying Shannon’s source/channel model, suppose that when we have a thought T that we want to convey with an utterance U, we act as if our hearer has a prior P(T) over the possible thoughts we may be conveying and estimates a probability P(U|T) that we will have used U to express T. As you well know, according to Shannon, the hearer should find the T that maximizes P(U|T)*P(T) in order to decide what we meant. But the amount of effort that the speaker puts into U will determine the probability that the hearer will get the message T correctly. If the speaker thinks the prior on T is high, then he may choose a shorter U that has a less peaked probability of only coming from T. If I say to my wife “I got it,” I can get by with this short cryptic message, if I think there is a very high probability that she will know what “it” is, but I am taking a risk.

My conjecture is that the acceptable trade-off between linguistic effort and risk of being misunderstood is socially determined over time by each language community and embodied in the language itself. If the probability of being misunderstood varies smoothly with linguistic effort (i.e., bits) without any sharp discontinuities, then there is no reason to suppose that different linguistic communities would end up at exactly the same place on this curve.

Tru dat.

And before we get into cultural differences in tolerance for optional ambiguity and risk, note that simple differences in morphology and syntax are likely to have a significant effect here. Definiteness and plurality are somewhat redundant, but by no means entirely so; and they are sometimes relevant, but by no means always so. Therefore, if a language insists on marking definiteness and plurality on every noun, it forces more entropy into the channel. Similarly, requiring explicit as opposed to null pronouns will increase the explicit information content.

In my earlier post, I tried to estimate how much effect such differences between Chinese and English could have, and I came up short of the observed differences in compressed text size. Maybe my back-of-the-imaginary-envelope estimates were inadequate; or maybe gzip isn’t good enough to eliminate some of the effects of differences in superficial orthographic conventions. But I have to admit that there might also be a difference in some sort of cultural set-point for communicative specificity.

[Note to self: try some better text compression progams (like SBC) on parallel-text archives, and see if the differences hold up.]

Posted by Mark Liberman at April 5, 2008 06:57 AM

Language Log: Mailbag: comparative communication efficiency

" } ["summary"]=> string(682) "Mailbag: comparative communication efficiency In yesterday’s post on “Comparing communication efficiency across languages“, I compared the sizes of the English and Chinese sides of parallel (i.e. translated) text corpora, and observed that English seems to require 20-40% more bits to express the same information, even after the application of compression techniques that ought to eliminate ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(11568) "

Mailbag: comparative communication efficiency

In yesterday’s post on “Comparing communication efficiency across languages“, I compared the sizes of the English and Chinese sides of parallel (i.e. translated) text corpora, and observed that English seems to require 20-40% more bits to express the same information, even after the application of compression techniques that ought to eliminate most of the superficial and local reasons for such a difference. Bob Moore sent an interesting comment:

I can think of at least couple of reasons that might explain how there can appear to be a difference between the communication efficiency of two languages. One suggests that it might only be apparent; the other explains why it might be real.

Bob’s first suggestion, about how to explain the difference away:

First, I would not trust gzip to yield an accurate measure of the information content of a given text. You probably recall that Peter Brown et al. showed in their 1992 CL paper on the entropy of English that a simple tri-gram language model yields more than twice the compression of standard text compression algorithms, 1.75 bits per character vs. more than 4 bits per character. Furthermore, If memory serves, the Shannon game of guessing the next character yields a number of around 1 bit per character for English, if there is a human brain in the loop. Playing the Shannon game with the two sides of a bilingual corpus might produce a more accurate comparison than gzip.

I agree that gzip doesn’t distill all the redundancy out of text, though it’s a lot better than compress, which is the algorithm that produced the estimate of “more than 4 bits per character” — the output of compress is about 85% larger on standard test corpora than the output of gzip, which in turn is about 20% larger than szip, and about 43% larger than SBC on standard test corpora. But we’re looking at a comparison of information content between two sources, and that should be somewhat better estimated by standard compression techniques (even older ones like gzip), especially with respect to local factors.

Take a look at these tables from Balkenhol and Kurz, “Universal Data Compression Based on the Burrows-Wheeler Transformation”, IEEE Transactions on Computers, 49(10), 2000), comparing compression rates for different algorithms across the text files in two standard test corpora. The antique compress algorithm yields file sizes more than twice those of BK98, and gzip gives sizes about 15-20%  greater — but the bits-per-character values for different subcorpora are highly correlated across algorithms (e.g. r=0.96 between gzip and BK98 across the various files in the Calgary corpus):

While we’re on the subject, let me recommend to you the classical references that Bob cites. The trigram model reference is Peter Brown, Vincent Della Pietra, Robert Mercer, Stephen Della Pietra, and Jennifer Lai, “An estimate of an upper bound for the entropy of English“, Computational Linguistics, 18(1): 31-40, 1992. And while their model is “simple” compared to some other things one might think of, there’s actually quite a bit to it. It models English in four stochastic steps:

1. It generates a hidden string of tokens using a token trigram model.
2. It generates a spelling for each token.
3. It generates a case for each spelling.
4. It generates a spacing string to separate cased spellings from one another.

A genuinely “simple” trigram model, in which case, spelling and spacing were simply handled by multiplying the number of tokens, would not have done as well.

In their paper’s famous conclusion, Brown et al. take care to note all the things that they are leaving out:

From a loftier perspective, we cannot help but notice that linguistically the trigram concept, which is the workhorse of our language model, seems almost moronic. It captures local tactic constraints by sheer force of numbers, but the more well-protected bastions of semantic, pragmatic, and discourse constraint and even morphological and global syntactic constraint remain unscathed, in fact unnoticed. Surely the extensive
work on these topics in recent years can be harnessed to predict English better than we have yet predicted it.

We see this paper as a gauntlet thrown down before the computational linguistics community. The Brown Corpus is a widely available, standard corpus and the subject of much linguistic research. By predicting the corpus character by character, we obviate the need for a common agreement on a vocabulary. Given a model, the computations required to determine the cross-entropy are within reach for even a modest research budget. We hope by proposing this standard task to unleash a fury of competitive energy that will gradually corral the wild and unruly thing that we know the English language to be.

The history of efforts to estimate the entropy of English by asking human to guess the next character in a text begins with another one of Bob’s references: Claude Shannon, “Prediction and entropy of printed English“, Bell System Technical Journal ,30:50-64, 1951. Shannon came up with a range of 0.6 to 1.3 bits per character.

A quarter century later, Cover and King (“A convergent gambling estimate of the entropy of English“, IEEE Transactions on Information Theory”, 24(4):413-421, 1978) used a slightly different technique to sharpen the estimate to 1.25-1.35 bits per character.

Unfortunately, the Shannon/Cover-King results are not strictly comparable to the Brown et al. results, nor to the other algorithmic compression-rate results. The experiments test on different texts, deal with various formatting issues in different ways, estimate entropy by different methods — and especially, they have radically different standards for how to amortize the entropy of the “dictionary” and other prior knowledge involved. The techniques based on human guessing don’t add any cost for transmitting knowledge of English (as opposed to Chinese or French or whatever); the same is basically true of the Brown et al. study, as I recall, since they simply base their estimate on the cross-entropy of the test text given the model, without any provision for transmitting the model. In contrast, the other algorithmic compression techniques start out equally ready to compress text from any source, and must build up and encode their expectations incrementally in the compressed output.

Anyhow, I think that modern compression techniques should be able to remove most of the obvious and simple reasons for differences in document size among translations in different languages, like different spacing or spelling conventions. If there are residual differences among languages, this either relates to redundancies that are not being modeled — along the lines sketched in Brown et al.’s conclusion — or it reflects a different sort of difference between languages and cultures, which Bob Moore picks up in his second point:

Second, why should we expect two languages to use the same number of bits to convey the same thoughts? I believe that when we speak or write we always simplify the complexity of what is actually in our heads, and different languages might implicitly do this more than others. Applying Shannon’s source/channel model, suppose that when we have a thought T that we want to convey with an utterance U, we act as if our hearer has a prior P(T) over the possible thoughts we may be conveying and estimates a probability P(U|T) that we will have used U to express T. As you well know, according to Shannon, the hearer should find the T that maximizes P(U|T)*P(T) in order to decide what we meant. But the amount of effort that the speaker puts into U will determine the probability that the hearer will get the message T correctly. If the speaker thinks the prior on T is high, then he may choose a shorter U that has a less peaked probability of only coming from T. If I say to my wife “I got it,” I can get by with this short cryptic message, if I think there is a very high probability that she will know what “it” is, but I am taking a risk.

My conjecture is that the acceptable trade-off between linguistic effort and risk of being misunderstood is socially determined over time by each language community and embodied in the language itself. If the probability of being misunderstood varies smoothly with linguistic effort (i.e., bits) without any sharp discontinuities, then there is no reason to suppose that different linguistic communities would end up at exactly the same place on this curve.

Tru dat.

And before we get into cultural differences in tolerance for optional ambiguity and risk, note that simple differences in morphology and syntax are likely to have a significant effect here. Definiteness and plurality are somewhat redundant, but by no means entirely so; and they are sometimes relevant, but by no means always so. Therefore, if a language insists on marking definiteness and plurality on every noun, it forces more entropy into the channel. Similarly, requiring explicit as opposed to null pronouns will increase the explicit information content.

In my earlier post, I tried to estimate how much effect such differences between Chinese and English could have, and I came up short of the observed differences in compressed text size. Maybe my back-of-the-imaginary-envelope estimates were inadequate; or maybe gzip isn’t good enough to eliminate some of the effects of differences in superficial orthographic conventions. But I have to admit that there might also be a difference in some sort of cultural set-point for communicative specificity.

[Note to self: try some better text compression progams (like SBC) on parallel-text archives, and see if the differences hold up.]

Posted by Mark Liberman at April 5, 2008 06:57 AM

Language Log: Mailbag: comparative communication efficiency

" ["date_timestamp"]=> int(1631300953) } [9]=> array(11) { ["title"]=> string(88) "It has several floors, 5 bathrooms and its closest neighbor is Julia Roberts – Para Ti" ["link"]=> string(103) "https://bofads.com/it-has-several-floors-5-bathrooms-and-its-closest-neighbor-is-julia-roberts-para-ti/" ["dc"]=> array(1) { ["creator"]=> string(10) "Susan Paul" } ["pubdate"]=> string(31) "Fri, 10 Sep 2021 19:07:58 +0000" ["category"]=> string(72) "Movie Production CompaniesbathroomsclosestfloorsJulianeighborparaRoberts" ["guid"]=> string(103) "https://bofads.com/it-has-several-floors-5-bathrooms-and-its-closest-neighbor-is-julia-roberts-para-ti/" ["description"]=> string(727) "The townhouse of the actor, consists of several floors and almost four hundred square meters and represents the aesthetics of the West Village, with its picturesque, predominantly residential streets. It is in an area inhabited by several Hollywood stars, and surrounded by cafes, trendy restaurants and vintage boutiques. When the actor Bradley Cooper and model ... Read more" ["content"]=> array(1) { ["encoded"]=> string(7665) "
The townhouse of the actor, consists of several floors and almost four hundred square meters and represents the aesthetics of the West Village, with its picturesque, predominantly residential streets. It is in an area inhabited by several Hollywood stars, and surrounded by cafes, trendy restaurants and vintage boutiques.

When the actor Bradley Cooper and model Irina Shayk were together, in May 2018, they moved into an impressive mansion in in the West Village of New York, which the actor acquired for $ 13.5 million. Currently, and after the separation, it is his residence, which he shares with his daughter.

Both were looking for a house to share with their little daughter Lea de Siene, and the actor decided on the most bohemian neighborhood in the Big Apple. Only one year did the coexistence with the Russian model last, since in June 2020 the couple separated. Irina moved into an apartment not far from her ex’s residence in order to facilitate the girl’s transfers under her joint custody agreement.

The townhouse of Cooper, consists of several floors and almost four hundred square meters and represents the aesthetics of the area, with its picturesque streets, predominantly residential, escaping the bustle of the city that never sleeps and its particular layout, nothing to do with the strict grid with the one that planned the expansion of Manhattan, through which you can walk aimlessly to lose yourself among cafes, trendy restaurants and vintage boutiques.

The actor’s house, built in 1905, had been a building with four apartments for rent until an investment group bought it in 2010 and converted it and now has six bedrooms and five bathrooms, a basement study, a great room with High ceilings and an amazing back garden with a terrace.

The five-story mansion, underfloor heating, a whole house audio system and home automation controlled lighting and even a remote controlled fireplace.

In addition, it has a connection to the series Friends: although it was shot in a studio, this was the building that was shown in the exterior plans of the home of Monica, Rachel, Joey y Chandler. And lovers of the series Sex in New York you will realize as you walk through the West Village that many of its scenes were shot on its streets.

It is an area in which several stars live, such as Sarah Jessica Parker y Matthew Broderick, Tiger Woods and her closest neighbor is Julia Roberts. Jennifer Aniston He was also a resident until 2012, when he sold his apartment for more than $ 6 million.

Bounded by 14th Street (to the north), West Houston Street (to the south), 6th Avenue (to the east), and the Hudson River (to the west), the West is located just west of Greenwich Village, a neighborhood with the that shares the restaurants and jazz clubs, the small business, is a residential and quiet neighborhood.

In the early and mid-20th century, it became synonymous with avant-garde and artistic freedom. Its streets were inhabited by writers, actors, intellectuals and bohemians who placed the neighborhood at the heart of various progressive movements. In fact, among the highlights are the Village Vanguard jazz club and the Stonewall Inn bar, site of the 1969 riots that marked the beginning of the gay rights movement. Time has transformed it and today it is one of the most exclusive neighborhoods in Manhattan, with homes that sell for millions.

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It has several floors, 5 bathrooms and its closest neighbor is Julia Roberts – Para Ti

" } ["summary"]=> string(727) "The townhouse of the actor, consists of several floors and almost four hundred square meters and represents the aesthetics of the West Village, with its picturesque, predominantly residential streets. It is in an area inhabited by several Hollywood stars, and surrounded by cafes, trendy restaurants and vintage boutiques. When the actor Bradley Cooper and model ... Read more" ["atom_content"]=> string(7665) "
The townhouse of the actor, consists of several floors and almost four hundred square meters and represents the aesthetics of the West Village, with its picturesque, predominantly residential streets. It is in an area inhabited by several Hollywood stars, and surrounded by cafes, trendy restaurants and vintage boutiques.

When the actor Bradley Cooper and model Irina Shayk were together, in May 2018, they moved into an impressive mansion in in the West Village of New York, which the actor acquired for $ 13.5 million. Currently, and after the separation, it is his residence, which he shares with his daughter.

Both were looking for a house to share with their little daughter Lea de Siene, and the actor decided on the most bohemian neighborhood in the Big Apple. Only one year did the coexistence with the Russian model last, since in June 2020 the couple separated. Irina moved into an apartment not far from her ex’s residence in order to facilitate the girl’s transfers under her joint custody agreement.

The townhouse of Cooper, consists of several floors and almost four hundred square meters and represents the aesthetics of the area, with its picturesque streets, predominantly residential, escaping the bustle of the city that never sleeps and its particular layout, nothing to do with the strict grid with the one that planned the expansion of Manhattan, through which you can walk aimlessly to lose yourself among cafes, trendy restaurants and vintage boutiques.

The actor’s house, built in 1905, had been a building with four apartments for rent until an investment group bought it in 2010 and converted it and now has six bedrooms and five bathrooms, a basement study, a great room with High ceilings and an amazing back garden with a terrace.

The five-story mansion, underfloor heating, a whole house audio system and home automation controlled lighting and even a remote controlled fireplace.

In addition, it has a connection to the series Friends: although it was shot in a studio, this was the building that was shown in the exterior plans of the home of Monica, Rachel, Joey y Chandler. And lovers of the series Sex in New York you will realize as you walk through the West Village that many of its scenes were shot on its streets.

It is an area in which several stars live, such as Sarah Jessica Parker y Matthew Broderick, Tiger Woods and her closest neighbor is Julia Roberts. Jennifer Aniston He was also a resident until 2012, when he sold his apartment for more than $ 6 million.

Bounded by 14th Street (to the north), West Houston Street (to the south), 6th Avenue (to the east), and the Hudson River (to the west), the West is located just west of Greenwich Village, a neighborhood with the that shares the restaurants and jazz clubs, the small business, is a residential and quiet neighborhood.

In the early and mid-20th century, it became synonymous with avant-garde and artistic freedom. Its streets were inhabited by writers, actors, intellectuals and bohemians who placed the neighborhood at the heart of various progressive movements. In fact, among the highlights are the Village Vanguard jazz club and the Stonewall Inn bar, site of the 1969 riots that marked the beginning of the gay rights movement. Time has transformed it and today it is one of the most exclusive neighborhoods in Manhattan, with homes that sell for millions.

More information at parati.com.ar

TOPICS

Comments

Many Thanks To The following Website For This Valuable Content.
It has several floors, 5 bathrooms and its closest neighbor is Julia Roberts – Para Ti

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